Renewable Energy: Our Only Way Out?

Calling  themselves “two working-class Millennials,” authors Zack Howell and Ben Ragains offer a documentary view of the truly dystopian reality of trying to push fossil fuel energy in the face of what now seems to be almost cataclysmic global warming, at least according to President Barack Obama and some highly reputable climate scientists.

The documentary is a work in progress, and the creators have turned to Kickstarter to raise at least $10,000. Without that amount, the say, the project cannot continue to its logical conclusion, which is to examine the “cognitive dissonance of  the realities of peak oil and climate change” via interviews with author Richard Heinberg (The End of Growth; Blackout: Coal, Climate and the Last Energy Crisis) and futurist Ray Kurzweil, whose philosophy suggests that he has already given up on the human race and wants to move into the realm of artificial intelligence, or AI.

climate change documentary

image via Shutterstock

The documentary is touted as offering “a positive, solutions-based approach to the underlying problems humanity faces as a society.” But one wonders if the solutions are adequate to the problem, or if the two young Los Angelenos, Howell and Ragains, can offer something of sufficient probative value given the thousands of other, and older, climate scientists who are pulling out their hair trying to find a way around that Terrible Two—the two degrees (Celsius) of warming that will reportedly tip earth over into runaway climate change.

Titled “Our Only Way Out,” the documentary looks at renewable energy technologies like solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, wind, geothermal and alternative fuels as the last gasp (perhaps literally) in a post-carbon world. The problem with that post-carbon world is that it isn’t enough post. In other words, experts expect coal to last at least another 100 years, with natural gas expected to last the same length of time at current consumption rates (though U.S. oil reserves only have another 40 years). But even 40 years is probably too long to go on burning fossil fuels if we don’t want to destroy earth’s climate.

Those looking to support these would-be documentarians on Kickstarter have until Monday, April 30, at 1:04 a.m. EDT to act.

  • jburt56

    There’s fusion.  Not the type you’ve heard of.