Logitech Wireless Keyboard Solar Powered

Computer accessories manufacturer Logitech has introduced a new green friendly wireless keyboard which can be powered by almost any available light source, be it the sun or the overhead lights in your cubicle. It is called the Logitech Wireless Solar Keyboard K750 and it will be available this month in the U.S. and Europe for around $80.

The Logitech Wireless Solar Keyboard K750 sports integrated solar panels which can be powered by indoor light, eliminating the need for batteries commonly found in wireless keyboards to power the connectivity and other functions. The keyboard, when fully charged, can stay functional for what is said to be at least three months in total darkness. An integrated power indicator light also lets you know when the juice is about dried up so you can recharge the keyboard.

Logitech Wireless Solar Keyboard K750

image via Logitech

Logitech’s keyboard, complete with PVC-free construction and fully recyclable packaging, will work with an included solar app that the company says “features a lux meter to help you get the necessary light, makes it easy to get at-a-glance information about battery levels, and even alerts you when you need more power.”

Other features of the K750 include a 1/3-inch thickness, special keys said to support the shape of one’s fingertips, 2.4 GHz wireless connectivity and an included wireless connector one plugs into a computer in order to use the keyboard with. This connector supports up to six compatible Logitech mice and keyboards as well.

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I am the editor-in-chief and founder for EarthTechling. This site is my desire to bring the world of green technology to consumers in a timely and informative matter. Prior to this my previous ventures have included a strong freelance writing career and time spent at Silicon Valley start ups.