5 Green Grilling Options For A Smog-Free Summer

Memorial Day marks the official beginning of the summer grilling season, and around the country, we’ll be abandoning our hot kitchens for the sizzle and pop of outdoor cooking. If you’re the grill master in your family, you already know the secret to getting a wonderful smoky char without burning away the flavor. But did you know that the very act of grilling with charcoal contributes to toxic air pollution that makes people and planet sick?

Don’t worry. There are plenty of options for grilling green, from cleaner fuels to high tech grills that use renewable energy. Browse through the options below, and let us know which one makes your mouth water!

Cookup 200 Solar Barbecue

Cookup 200 solar grill

Image via ID COOK

Most portable grills require charcoal or gas, and deliver lackluster performance compared to a home grill. Not so with the Cookup 200. With its parabolic shape, this solar grill focuses all of the sun’s energy on to the food being cooked. Food cooks quickly, with no smoke or CO2 emissions. Although it looks big, the entire grill can be assembled in minutes and fits neatly into a convenient carry bag.

Grill Dome

grill dome

Image via Grill Dome

While we may never settle the debate over whether charcoal or propane is worst for the planet, one thing is for sure: ceramic grills are much more fuel efficient than metal grills and can reduce the total carbon footprint of cooking outdoors. The Grill Dome is made from Terapex ceramics, which retain much greater levels of heat than many other ceramics. Thus, much less fuel is required, no lighter fluid is necessary, and in some cases, you can even reuse the charcoal.

>>Keep Reading for more green grilling options!

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog