Can 12W NanoLight LED Deliver On 100W Promises?

Once again, an LED is making waves on Kickstarter. Like others, it promises a long life and big energy savings, but unlike previous LEDs, employs a design that some have called ”an early glimpse into the future of household LED lighting.”

Whether or not the NanoLight can deliver on its claim of being the ‘world’s most energy-efficient light bulb’ still remains to be seen, but if public enthusiasm is any indicator, the future is bright. Looking more like a piece of abstract art than a light bulb, the NanoLight has already gathered more than 10 times its original funding goal.

NanoLight, Kickstarter, LED

Image via NanoLight

Designed by Gimmy Chu, Tom Rodinger, Christian Yan, all graduates of the University of Toronto, the NanoLight claims to generate over 1600 lumens, equivalent to a 100W incandescent light bulb, while consuming only 12 watts of power. While 20-60W equivalent LED light bulbs are fairly common, it’s harder to find a true replacement for 75-100W incandescents. The NanoLight operates at 133 lumens per watt which, according to its creators, is about 200% better than other light bulbs available on the market.

Another advantage of the NanoLight is its omnidirectional design. Unlike other LEDs, the NanoLight emulates the classic lightbulb and directs light in all directions. It also achieves full brightness the instant it is turned on, making it superior to the often cheaper CFLs that take a minute to warm up.

For a small startup, NanoLight has big goals: “We center every aspect of our work at the NanoLight around creating higher energy efficiency, reducing carbon footprints and creating ecological value in all of our products,” the company says in its mission statement. “At the most fundamental level, our purpose is to create energy efficient LED lighting that is innovative and economical, so that our planet can have a brighter future.”

At this point, nearly 5,000 Kickstarter backers think they can deliver.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog