Underwater Turbine Catches Ride On Scot Tides

ScottishPower Renewables has just completed an initial testing period for its 1-megawatt (MW) tidal power project in the Orkney isles, located off the northern tip of Scotland.

The underwater turbine was installed last December and is set to be used in Scotland’s first and only consented tidal power project. Since it began operating, the turbine has been providing electricity for homes and businesses on the island of Eday, one of Orkneys’ northern isles.

turbine

image via ScottishPower Renewables

Regarded as being at the cutting edge of tidal turbine design, the underwater HS1000 tidal turbine has been developed by Andritz Hydro Hammerfest using a technology mix combining traditional onshore wind turbines, subsea oil and gas production and hydro-power plants.

The turbine can generate enough power to supply 500 homes annually, ScottishPower Renewables said. A prototype device has been generating electricity in Norway for over six years.

The HS1000 was put in place last winter in some of the worst weather conditions Scotland has experienced in more than a decade. The device has since been undergoing testing in the fast flowing tidal waters that surround the Orkneys.

ScottishPower Renewables said the initial testing period had “been very positive with the device achieving full export power.”

In a statement, CEO of ScottishPower Renewables Keith Anderson said: “The concept of generating electricity from the natural movement of the tide is still relatively new – and test projects like this are vital to help us understand how we can fully realize the potential of this substantial energy source.

“The performance of the first HS1000 device has given us great confidence so far. Engineers were able install the device during atrocious weather conditions, and it has been operating to a very high standard ever since. We have already greatly developed our understanding of tidal power generation, and this gives us confidence ahead of implementing larger scale projects in Islay and the Pentland Firth.”

Paul Willis has been journalist for a decade. Starting out in Northern England, from where he hails, he worked as a reporter on regional papers before graduating to the cut-throat world of London print media. On the way he spent a year as a correspondent in East Africa, writing about election fraud, drought and an Ethiopian version of American Idol. Since moving to America three years ago he has worked as a freelancer, working for CNN.com and major newspapers in Britain, Australia and North America. He writes on subjects as diverse as travel, media ethics and human evolution. He lives in New York where, in spite of the car fumes and the sometimes eccentric driving habits of the yellow cabs, he rides his bike everywhere.

    • David Ralson

      Help,if someone can send this info. to someone that can use it (GREAT) I have  about 100ft wide. X 500ft long land that is under the tenn.river and would like a compampy or inventer to use it FREE to make power turbins,this river has meny dams that makes power,so why not install under water turbins to make power Thank You      David Ralson 506 Marker Street N.E.Decatur,Alabama, USA 35601-1977 256/350-5111 or 256/353-4419 Lets get together and makte some power