Aussie Wave Power Tech Washes Ashore In Bermuda

Bermuda is on the way to getting its first wave energy installation after a yearlong study showed the Caribbean island’s viability for commercial marine power.

Australian wave energy developer Carnegie Wave Energy carried out the feasibility study using a wave measuring buoy in the waters off the Bermuda coast.

bermuda

image via Carnegie

The buoy collected data on the power and frequency of waves over a 12-month period. The study was carried out in collaboration with Bermudian company Triton Renewable Energy, and with the technical support of the Ground Electronics Services and Bermuda Weather Service.

Working together with Triton, Carnegie said it was planning to develop a commercial scale wave farm providing up to 20 megawatts (MW) of electricity generation and desalinated water to Bermuda.

Bermuda is one of the highest consumers of energy per capita in the world and the island’s government has been looking at ways of decreasing its reliance on imported diesel. Like many remote islands, Bermuda imports most of the fuel needed to supply its energy needs, at a significant expense to the island’s finances and to the environment.

The Bermudan government has already set goals in an Energy White Paper, released last year, of cutting the island’s carbon dioxide emissions drastically by 2020.

In a statement, Tim Hasselbring, Triton’s managing director, said: “Bermuda is a densely populated isolated oceanic island with limited natural resources that can be called upon. This project promises significant benefits to the community in the form of job creation, significantly increased energy and freshwater security and reduced dependence on imported oil.”

“As a densely populated isolated oceanic island with a sophisticated infrastructure, Bermuda has limited natural resources that we can call upon. What we do have, in constant motion day and night, is ocean swell,” Hasselbring added.

Paul Willis has been journalist for a decade. Starting out in Northern England, from where he hails, he worked as a reporter on regional papers before graduating to the cut-throat world of London print media. On the way he spent a year as a correspondent in East Africa, writing about election fraud, drought and an Ethiopian version of American Idol. Since moving to America three years ago he has worked as a freelancer, working for CNN.com and major newspapers in Britain, Australia and North America. He writes on subjects as diverse as travel, media ethics and human evolution. He lives in New York where, in spite of the car fumes and the sometimes eccentric driving habits of the yellow cabs, he rides his bike everywhere.

1 Comment

  • Reply May 19, 2012

    Blowitoutyourarse99

    BOLLOCKS!
    Carnegie is a SCAM company.
    All the loot goes down the company executive trousers.
    Like all wave energy companies they deliver nothing but broken promises.
    The idea of collecting wave energy from below the surface is laughable.
    The idea of using pumped water for desalination is just a smokescreen to hide that fact that CETO (Mark, 1,2,3,4,etc DOESN’T FREAKING WORK AT ALL)

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