Munich’s ‘NuOffice’ Snags Highest LEED Rating Ever Issued

Outside of our homes, most of us probably spend the vast majority of our lives at work. Whether it’s a traditional office building with cubicles and conference rooms, or a coworking space, our workspace is a big enough part of our day that we should care about whether it’s a healthy place to be. No matter how green your office may be, it’s likely to pale in comparison to the NuOffice, however.

Recently completed in Munich, NuOffice is a commercial property some say is the greenest office building in the world. Commissioned by Haupt Immobilien, and created with the help of research group DIRECTION and the Fraunhofer Institute for Building Physics, NuOffice recently received the highest LEED rating ever issued for a building of its type.

NuOffice Munich

Image via NuOffice.de

The US Green Building Council, which manages the LEED green building certification program, awarded NuOffice an astounding 94 points. This rating is well about the 80 points that are required to achieve LEED Platinum, currently the highest standard for an environmentally-friendly structure recognized by the USGBC.

According to DIRECTION, “A maximum of 37 points was attributed under ‘energy and atmosphere’. The building reached 25 out of a maximum of 28 points in the  ‘sustainable sites’ criteria. Innovative solutions in design and building implementation were another area where NuOffice stands out.”

NuOffice Munich

Image via NuOffice.de

To earn these illustrious grades, the NuOffice sports a photovoltaic solar system that almost covers the entire roof. It also triple-glazed windows to help keep hot and cool air where it belongs, and efficient LED lighting that’s managed by a monitoring system–when there’s plenty of daylight, the LEDs are automatically dimmed to save power.

The building also utilizes a complex passive-cooling system, which, according to Gizmag, “appears to tap into subterranean groundwater, perhaps operating as a heat-sink.”

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog