Eddie Bauer & Goal Zero Collaborate On Solar-Powered Tent

Camping may seem synonymous with low-tech life (at least for a few days) but just like everything else in our world, it’s hard to stay analog for long. Eddie Bauer just leaked news that it’s working on a pretty impressive upgrade for the tent industry, a solar-powered shelter that’s designed to work with the Sherpa 50 power pack from Goal Zero.

Besides pictures of the tent, which will be called the Power Katabatic, there are precious few details about how it will work. What we do know is that it will probably make it a lot easier to keep your devices running in the wild–which could be a good or bad thing, depending on how you look at it.

Eddie Bauer Power Katabatic Tent

Image via Eddie Bauer

The solar tent’s design is based on Eddie Bauer’s previously released (and quite popular) Katabatic tent, ”three person, four-season expedition tent is the new standard for the world most hostile environments.” Anyone who’s camping in the “fourth season” would probably find a fully-charged GPS and a heated sleeping bag pretty handy, so the Katabatic went on a date with some solar panels.

The Power Katabatic features a custom-designed, triangular Goal Zero solar panel on top. And word has it that the folds with the tent for storage. Inside you’ll find everything you need to connect the panel to a Goal Zero Sherpa 50 power pack which can store the power inside for nighttime use.

Eddie Bauer Power Katabatic Tent

Image via Eddie Bauer

Now, this is a pretty awesome integration of green technology, but before you get too excited, let’s talk price. The regular old Katabatic tent costs a whopping $499. And we already know that the Goal Zero Sherpa sells for around $360. And who knows what a folding, triangular solar panels costs. So be prepared–although it’s not yet official, it looks like the Power Katabatic could be upwards of $800. We hope Eddie Bauer proves us wrong, though.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog