Pump-Action TurboCool Chills Your Beer In Mere Seconds!

There is nothing worse than reaching for an adult beverage at the end of a long day, only to find out that it’s warm. (OK there are plenty of worse things, but warm beer is pretty disappointing). In such dire straights, many of us have been forced to employ undignified measures like adding ice cubes or sticking a six pack in the freezer (and praying that it doesn’t explode).

TurboCool, a new gadget gathering steam on Kickstarter, aims to make this frustrating experience a thing of the past. Whether it’s root beer or the hard stuff, this revolutionary device is designed to bring your favorite canned beverage down to drinking temp in mere seconds–all without batteries or electricity!

TurboCool

Image via TurboCool

Dubber “the rapid cooler” TurboCool uses a combination of physics and magic to take a can from tepid to frigid in a matter of seconds. Simply add ice and/or cold water to the devices inner chamber, then place your canned beverage inside. Seal it up and start pumping. The action rotates the can using the vacuum and proximity to rapidly chill the contents.

“Cooling time varies depending on how warm your can is to start, the temperature of the liquid inside the TurboCool, and how fast and for long you pump,” explain the designers on Kickstarter. “Our prototype gets our drinks from warm to cold drinkability in about a minute. Pump longer and it will be even colder.”

And don’t worry about explosions–TurboCool is designed so the movement of the can is smoothly in one direction so it won’t shake up your can.

With the TurboCool, canned beverages can remain at room temperature until you’re ready to consume them, leaving valuable fridge and cooler space for food. This makes the gadget perfect for picnics, porch parties, tailgating, camping, and more.

If fully funded, the TurboCool will be made right here in the USA. A pledge of just $31 dollars will make you one of the very first to own one.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog