Hollywood Park To Be Reborn As Green Community

For 75 years, the Hollywood Park Racetrack in Inglewood, Calif., has played a major role in the a history of Southern California horse racing, hosting such thoroughbred winners as Seabiscuit, Citation, Affirmed and Ferdinand. After the end of this season, the track will close its paddock doors for the last time due to declining profitability.

The land, however, will live on as a new, 238-acre eco-friendly community called Hollywood Park of Tomorrow. The slightly Disneyfied master plan created by The Robert Group will include 3,000 energy-efficient homes, a large system of lakes, a casino and 25 acres of parks that will be easily accessible by pedestrians.

The 75-year-old racetrack will close at the end of racing season to make way for a new eco-friendly community. Image via A/N Blog.

The 75-year-old racetrack will close at the end of racing season to make way for a new eco-friendly community. Image via A/N Blog.

The new Hollywood Park plan, which had been approved in 2009 but was delayed by the Great Recession, will be like a small city unto itself, with three distinct neighborhoods that will include single-family houses, townhomes, condos and senior living facilities. Along with the residential units, there are plans to include a mixed-use shopping district with 600,000 square feet of retail space and 75,000 square feet of commercial space, including a 300-room hotel.

A model of the planned Hollywood Park community, with 3,000 homes, a casino and 75,000 square feet of commercial space. Image via The Robert Group.

A model of the planned Hollywood Park community, with 3,000 homes, a casino and 75,000 square feet of commercial space. Image via The Robert Group.

To make this green community as efficient as possible, The Robert Group designed the homes to meet strict Energy Star conservation standards. These houses will incorporate double-paned windows to reduce utility costs, energy- and water-efficient appliances, and lighting and air-conditioning systems that reduce electricity consumption.

The map of the new Hollywood Park includes pedestrian-friendly streets, drought-resistant landscaping and 25 acres of public parks. Image via Hollywood Park Tomorrow.

The map of the new Hollywood Park includes pedestrian-friendly streets, drought-resistant landscaping and 25 acres of public parks. Image via Hollywood Park Tomorrow.

Stormwater that is produced within the community will be collected by the manmade lakes, ponds and vegetated areas for use as irrigation on the grounds. Drought-tolerant and native plants will also be used in the landscaping of the developments many green areas to reduce demand for water. The use of fertilizers and insecticides will also be curtailed to reduce environmental impacts.

Work on the project is expected to begin at the end of this racing season in late December, whereupon crews will begin dismantling the track. During construction, work crews will also recycle nearly all of the construction and demolition debris created. Once the project is completed, a comprehensive recycling program will help to reduce the community’s carbon footprint.

Randy Woods is a Seattle-based writer and editor with 20+ years of experience in the business publishing world. A former managing editor of Seattle Business, iSixSigma, Claims and Waste Age magazines, he has covered topics that include newspaper publishing, entrepreneurism, green businesses, insurance, environmental protection and garbage hauling (yes, really). He also contributes to the Career Center Blog for The Seattle Times and edits a photography magazine called PhotoMedia. When not working, he likes to hide out in Seattle movie theaters and attend film festivals—even on sunny days.

2 Comments

  • Reply December 22, 2013

    Truth

    What a pile of SHIT!!! It’s in INGLEWOOD!!!!! No one ever goes to Inglewood except for Hollypark and the Forum!!!

    Oh, and it’s “DISNEY-FIED!!!!” BAAAAAARRRRRRRRRRFFFFF!!!! Translation: it’s a steaming pile of SHIT!

    By the way…we ARE in a recession. And it is not THE “great recession”. That was in the ’30’s! And you DO NOT capitalize it. God, what narcissists!

    • Reply December 22, 2013

      Pete D

      That is an interesting question, whether to capitalize Great Recession. Thank you for raising it! Even though I disagree with your analysis, it is heartening to see someone out there giving careful consideration to questions of capitalization. Quite often these days we see words capitalized that have no business being capitalized. Whole words, even, strewn throughout comments! But onto the question of “great recession” vs. “Great Recession.” Even though we (and I speak as a U.S. resident and citizen) are no longer in recession by any technical measure, and have not been for years, the severity and lasting influence of the economic upheaval that began in late 2007 has, I think, earned it that title. The name “Great Recession” also serves as a good device for both linking it to and distinguishing it from the downturn of the 1930s, which of course is universally known as the Great Depression.

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