Solar-Powered Classroom Project Shines On Kickstarter

Kids these days. We shake our heads at their lack of physical activity or dependence or addiction to mobile devices (pot meet kettle). But kids today have access to amazing tools of innovation and creativity that suggests promising opportunities. It’s up to us to make sure they notice them, because when they do, spectacular things are possible.

Take this class of 4th graders from Central Park School in Durham, North Carolina. Together with their teacher, Aaron Sebens, the kids have been learning about energy. And not just the gas tank kind. Thrilled with the idea of solar energy, they started a Kickstarter project to take their classroom off the grid, but they’re achieving much more.

solar, classroom, Kickstarter

Image via Aaron Sebens/Kickstarter

“Did you know that every minute enough photons come down to earth from the sun to power our world for a year? And have you ever wanted to save money, electricity and have less pollution? Well that is our goal,” reads the Solar Classroom campaign page. “We believe in the sun and would like to fundraise to get enough money to buy solar panels for our classroom so we do not have to use any electricity from the power plant.”

Out of the mouth of babes. With all the debating and denying going on among the adults in our world, it’s refreshing to see a young mind grasp the simple genius of renewable energy.

The class set out to raise a mere $800 to set up a few solar panels. They surpassed that goal in a single day. Now, they’re well on their way to raising $3,000–enough add a wind turbine, tie the panels to the grid and sell clean energy to the Durham community.

There are only six more days left on the Kickstarter campaign. Find out how you can help the kids reach their new goal here.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog