Massive Spherical Movie Theater Upcycled From DVDs & CDs

Call me old fashioned, but I had no idea there was such a thing as a movie theater shaped like a mini-planet. Or movies in 5D. I’m still getting used to every other movie being in 3D! Apparently, Miniwiz Sustainable Energy Development has access to dimensions we don’t have here in America, because it just announced the construction of iGreen for Wanshang Dreamworld park: a 5D entertainment structure that will be built entirely from recycled CDs and DVDs.

According to Miniwiz, iGreen will be one of the worlds largest spherical structures, with approximately 50 square meters of floor space at its widest point. Besides showcasing the use of upcycled materials, the sphere will encase the entire museum complex creating a microclimate that allows for tropical plants and trees to be grown.

Visitors to this unique entertainment complex will have the pleasure of feeling like they’re outside, even when they’re in. “we created an unprecedented up-cycling process allowing us to use only post-consumer poly carbonate and agricultural waste,” said Christopher Yen, Head Materials Engineer at Miniwiz. The skin of iGreen will allow light to penetrate at daytime and spectacular lighting at night, making the orb an iconic landmark visible from far away. Although it seems extremely porous, the designers say this material can withstand Typhoon grade wind-gust, acid rain, earthquakes and UV radiation.

iGreen’s interior will feature furniture, ceilings, flooring and lighting fixtures also made from recycled post consumer waste materials, educating the end-consumer about sustainability in a fun, entertaining way. Visitors can enjoy a 5D flight simulator as well as a greened rooftop within the microclimate, a unique shopping and educational experience, coffee shops etc. “It’s amazing what you can make from reengineered trash,” Arthur Huang CEO of Miniwiz notes. iGreen is set to open in 2015 in Huaqiao.

 All images via Miniwiz

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog

  • robjob

    Apparently they also have dimensions we don’t have in the US. How one gets a ‘diameter of 50 square meters’ I don’t understand.

    • bethbot

      lol maybe they meant to say “approximately”…

      • robjob

        No you don’t understand what I am saying. A diameter can not be in square meters. It is impossible. It is like measuring an area in Litres. Diameter can only be a one dimensional measurement.

        • bethbot

          yeah, I know what diameter is, a straight line that passes through the center of the circle. what they’re trying to give us is an approximation of how far it is from one side of the sphere to the other.

          • robjob

            You do not put the unit of a diameter in square meters because it is ‘an approximation’. I don’t understand what you are getting at.

          • bethbot

            i am the woman who wrote the article :) i can tell you that it was taken directly from the materials on their website. nevertheless, you’re right, and I’ve amended the post to more accurately reflect what they were trying to say. thank you!

          • robjob

            Haha fair enough. It is a really neat project. Sorry, if I sounded rude!

          • bethbot

            no worries at all. diameter made sense, square footage made sense, but until you pointed it out, i didn’t realize they don’t make sense together!

        • bethbot

          Yes, I know what diameter is. A straight line across the center of the circle. I’m sure they’re trying to describe the width of the internal space…since its an Asian company it was probably a language mishap in the PR translation.

          • robjob

            It isn’t a quote. The woman who wrote the article wrote out 50 square meters. I know what they are trying to describe. My initial comment of ‘I don’t understand’ was meant to be facetious.

  • Jonathan_Justice

    50 square meters is not all that bug, only a little over 500 square feet. The spherical structure of the US Pavilion at the Montreal Worlds Fair in 1967 is 76 meters in diameter. A floor that exploited the full diameter would cover over 4500 square meters. The Plexiglas skin burned off in 1976, but the steel structure survived the fire and more than 15 years of abandonment to be included in an environmental issues museum built inside in the 1990′s.

    The claim to be among the largest spherical structures may simply reflect the consideration that spherical structures are very rarely built, or perhaps the source material meant to indicate a 50 meter diameter.