This Solar Concept House Really Gets Around

We’ve seen some buildings that respond to their environment with, say, thermochromic glass that tints in response to the heat of the sun, or water-filled ceramic walls that sweat when temperatures rise, aiding in passive cooling. But this is the first structure we’ve seen that was actually designed to change its shape, manually or automatically, in response to its owner’s desires.

Transformation House is a concept design by Michael Jantzen (which comes to us via Inhabitat) made up of five modular sections that rotate to change the function of its interior. You can choose to do so at the touch of a button, or based on a preset program — either way, various sections of the home catch the sun’s rays to warm it up, collect rainwater, and allow wind to cool it down via natural ventilation while your interior living space remains stationary and undisturbed.

Michael Jantzen Transformation House

image via Inhabitat / Michael Jantzen

In this super-futuristic house, your furnishing are stored inside four containers that rotate out of the glass floor when needed. (Oh look, the Johnsons are here! Time to rotate out the couch. And where did we put the bar again?) Say your little bundle of joy is on the way — you can simply pop on another segment and the Transformation House expands. Windows can be rotated 360 degrees, which means you’ll never tire of the same old view — and rather than turning on a lamp when the sun moves away from the window, you can simply move the window. Brilliant!

Michael Jantaen Transformation House

image via Inhabitat / Michael Jantzen

With all that innovation going on, you knew this home couldn’t be grid powered, right? Of course not. This design makes use of thin film solar across sections of a lightweight steel shell that provide for all of the home’s power needs.

Susan DeFreitas has covered all manner of green technology for EarthTechling since 2009. She is a graduate of Prescott College for the Liberal Arts and the Environment, and has a background in marketing green businesses. Her work on green living has been featured in Yes! Magazine, the Utne Reader and Natural Home.