Indian Point Nuclear Power & Replacing It With Clean Energy

Editor’s Note: EarthTechling is proud to repost this article courtesy of EcoWatch, Natural Resources Defense Council  and Riverkeeper.

In just the last year, New York State began developing at least 25 percent of the alternative electricity sources necessary to replace the Indian Point nuclear power plant, according to a new report released recently by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Riverkeeper. The report provides a detailed roadmap for fully and cost-effectively replacing the aging nuclear facility’s power with equal investments in  energy efficiency and renewable power sources alone, with no impact to the reliability of the region’s energy supply. The findings came just days before Nuclear Regulatory Commission relicensing hearings for Indian Point began.

“Indian Point is an obsolete, dangerous nuclear plant that’s far outlived its usefulness and must be closed,” said Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., chief prosecuting attorney for Riverkeeper and senior attorney at NRDC. “It simply makes no sense to keep operating forty year old reactors that are vulnerable to fire, earthquake, outside attack and a host of other potential disasters less than thirty miles from New York City. What’s more, we don’t need Indian Point’s power: this report shows definitively that we can replace it with entirely clean sources like energy efficiency, solar and wind without affecting the reliability of the grid, and with minimal cost increases to consumers. New York is safer, more secure and simply better off without Indian Point.”

Indian Point

image via EcoWatch

“In just the last year, New York State has already shown that it has the will and the ability to move forward with replacing Indian Point’s power,” said NRDC clean energy counsel Kit Kennedy. “When an earthquake, flooding or tornadoes—all of which we’ve seen in the area in recent years—could trigger a shutdown or even disaster at this aging plant, it’s clear we need to do something about it. We have better, safer options. New York should lead with bold new policies to ensure that energy efficiency, wind and solar power play the key role in replacing Indian Point’s power. This will keep New York energy secure, while making the state a clean energy leader. It’s common sense.”

The report, Indian Point Replacement Analysis—A Clean Energy Roadmapwas prepared by Synapse Energy Economics, Inc. and assesses clean energy resources in the state, as well as the policies necessary to implement them. This report follows a 2011 Synapse report commissioned by the groups that found there is a wide range of replacement energy options available in the state to reliably and cost-effectively replace Indian Point if its licenses are not renewed. This year’s report reaffirms those findings and follows up with a “how-to” policy guide, focusing solely on efficiency and renewable energy options.

Among its key findings, the analysis concludes that:

  • New York will maintain a surplus of energy capacity through 2020, even if Indian Point is retired.
  • A new transmission line under construction now and scheduled to come online next year—the 660 MW Hudson Transmission Project—will soon replace more than 25 percent of Indian Point’s 2,060 MW.
  • With the right policies in place, New York could rely on energy efficiency, wind and solar power resources alone to replace Indian Point’s power. The core of this report provides a detailed policy roadmap that describes how the state can secure this clean replacement power.
  • The portfolio of clean energy outlined in this report is expected to have a very small impact on consumer costs, adding an estimated 1 percent to energy bills in 2022—that’s one dollar a month for the average residential customer.

“Riverkeeper has led the fight to expose the risks posed by Indian Point for over a decade, a campaign that gained new urgency after the Fukushima nuclear disaster,” said Paul Gallay, president and Hudson Riverkeeper. “This report lays out a roadmap for replacing Indian Point’s power with clean, sustainable energy sources, thereby ensuring that a future without this dangerous nuclear plant is not only desirable but eminently achievable.”

EcoWatch is a cutting edge news service promoting the work of more than 1,000 grassroots environmental organizations, activists and community leaders worldwide. The site is honed in on the issues of water, air, food, energy and biodiversity, and promotes ongoing environmental campaigns including climate change, fracking, mountaintop removal, factory farming, sustainable agriculture and renewable energy.

2 Comments

  • Reply October 17, 2012

    JimHopf

    Given that the health risks and environmental impacts of fossil fueled power generation are orders of magnitude larger than those of nuclear, and installed renewable capacity, or conservation, should be used to retire fossil generators; not nuclear. In their efforts to close Indian Point, these groups are acting as enemies, not friends of the environment.

  • Reply October 20, 2012

    John Bailo

    New York should press forward with developing a localized hydrogen infrastructure for commercial, residential and industrial usage that includes hydrogen pipelines as an alternative to transmission lines, stationary fuel cells and FCV vehicles.

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