In Russia, A Summer Home That’s Open To The Elements

Now that the air is crisp and pumpkins are appearing on front porches, the summer months may seem too short. But if you live in Russia, the summer really is quite brief — National Geographic, in fact, has characterized the season as “the short, sweet release from the interminable cocoon of Russian winter.” The Dacha Origami summer home, designed by Peter Kostelov, makes the most of those warm months with a house that has no windows and no doors.

That’s right: this home is completely open to the outside (beyond offering shelter from the rain in a few key areas). Talk about an open floor plan.

 

Origama Dacha

image via Inhabitat / Peter Kostelov

Inhabitat reports that Kostelov only had one chance to consult with the client on this green home project, which was designed to be featured on the Dachniy Otvet television program. The clients made mention of the fact that they’re a sporty family that also enjoys hosting a lot of parties. Beyond that, they gave the designer a whole lot of creative freedom on the project, asking only that he not build a basketball court. Running with this, Kostelov created a sustainable timber structure with no doors or windows that takes advantage of solar-heated water.

This layered Dacha (country house) is open to the elements but also protected from it: when the sun is out, you can take a shower in an outdoor bathing area, but when rain darkens a summer’s day, the rooftop of the structure sports a sheltered kitchen, dining area and indoor shower that remain dry and hospitable.

Origama Dacha

image via Inhabitat / Peter Kostelov

All the water here is heated via solar thermal (with support from a solar battery), and the home was built almost entirely of sustainably grown timber. The design also puts an emphasis on the health and fitness of its inhabitants with built-in pull up bars, a seesaw and other thoughtful additions that conspire to create a kind of mini gym at the summer house. The lines are clean, modern and minimalist.

Susan DeFreitas has covered all manner of green technology for EarthTechling since 2009. She is a graduate of Prescott College for the Liberal Arts and the Environment, and has a background in marketing green businesses. Her work on green living has been featured in Yes! Magazine, the Utne Reader and Natural Home.