Dramatic Pendant Lamps Recycled From Textile Waste

How you choose to light your home can have a big impact on how much you enjoy being there. Not only does lighting affect your home’s ambiance, it’s also a big factor in home energy consumption. If you want your home to look and feel comfortable, without wasting energy, examining your light bulbs and light fixtures is a good place to start.

Depending on the type of feng shui you’ve got going on, an energy-efficient light bulb can look out of place. Not so with these ultra-modern, hand-crocheted lamps from designer Naomi Paul. Each of these stunning lamps comes complete with a Plumen low energy light bulb (which EarthTechling profiles here), and the very fabric from which they’re crocheted has been salvaged from fashion industry waste.

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Image via Naomi Paul

According to Paul, a textile and product designer from Britain, sustainability and sourcing of local materials is key to high quality design. These lamps, part of the OMI Pendant Collection series, are made from scraps of mercerized cotton and silk that might otherwise have been headed to the landfill. “Where normally this pre-consumer yarn waste would be discarded, here it is utilised to create stunning lighting solutions,” points out Paul on her website.

Each OMI lamp is crocheted by hand and available in limited edition color palettes, making them interchangeable according to the seasons. The original ‘OMI’ pendant collection was comprised of ‘glück’, ‘sonne’ and ‘hanna’, all flat pack designs which offer modern yet sculptural focal points within any space,” explains DesignBoom in this review. “Now ‘monika’, a large-scale chandelier with multi-bulb fittings, also available in XL size editions joins the others.”

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog