Central Florida EV Advocates Hope for a Quiet Revolution

Editor’s Note: EarthTechling is proud to repost this article courtesy of Transportation Nation. Author credit goes to Matthew Peddie.

Electric vehicle charging stations are springing up all over Florida — and a lot of them are concentrated around Orlando, which has more than 150 stations within a 70-mile radius. But uptake in central Florida has been … slow.

The Orlando Utilities Commission, which has installed 78 charging stations around the city, estimates there are about 700 electric vehicles currently on the road in Orlando. That’s a tiny percentage of the 915,960 cars and pickup trucks registered in Orange County, which encompasses most of the Orlando metropolitan area.

ev charging

image via Shutterstock

But alternative fuel advocates are hopeful the vehicles will eventually catch on in the Sunshine State. Florida’s electric vehicle infrastructure is growing quickly, and the U.S. Department of Energy lists 319 public charging stations across the state, provided with funding from federal stimulus money.

Orlando resident Mark Thomasen has been an advocate for electric vehicles in the city since 2008.  He worked for a company that installed many of the charging stations and now writes an EV blog. He says it’s been a challenge to build up acceptance of electric vehicles in the area. “There’s not as much of a green movement in central Florida, and in Florida versus say Washington, or Oregon or Colorado.”

Motorists might also balk at the upfront price.  Chevrolet’s plug-in electric-gasoline hybrid Volt sedan has a list price of $39,145, while Nissan’s all-electric Leafhas a base price of $35,000.  Even with the $7,500 federal tax rebate, the cars are comparatively expensive.

But Thomasen is confident EVs will catch on in Florida. He says they don’t face some of  the challenges of hydrogen, such as how to generate and store the gas, as well as the need to dvelop a high capacity, durable and inexpensive fuel cell. And he says even if drivers aren’t worried about the environmental cost of gasoline, EVs should appeal to people who don’t want to rely on foreign oil.

“Over here, what matters to people is energy independence,” he says. “People don’t realize how much fuel we use and how little we have within our border. So by moving to an electric car and getting off of that, we go to a different fuel source.”

And Thomasen says electric vehicles at least have the infrastructure to support them, unlike hydrogen fuel cars.

Seven years ago there was a big push to build a hydrogen fuel infrastructure in California and in Florida. In 2005,  Florida Governor Jeb Bush broke ground on the state’s first hydrogen fueling station in Orlando.  “Florida is spurring investment in the development and use of pollution-free hydrogen technology,” said Gov. Bush.  The new station was to be part of a “hydrogen hub” in central Florida, and the first of a series of stations fueling a fleet of clean energy vehicles.

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