Sugarcane Wall Panels Add Recycled Texture To Your Favorite Room

As a renter, I often feel conflicted about making any sort of improvements to my dwelling. On one hand, I like the idea of customizing my home to fit my personal tastes and style. On the other hand, anything more than a thumbtack just means I’ll likely be paying for my “improvement” on move-out day. Anything architectural, like light fixtures, wall treatments, or molding is usually out of the question.

Most renters can handle the limited options for decorating if the home is relatively new and well kept. Find yourself renting a less-than-modern flat on the wrong side of town, however, and it can become a major issue. That’s why so many lessees enjoy the versatility of removable wall panels. They can add life and texture, as well as cover up unsightly stains, cracks or holes. With these bagasse-based panels from WallArt, they also come with a small carbon footprint and are completely compostable.

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Image via WallArt

Unlike paneling, conventional paint, or wallpaper, which are less than sustainable, WallArt’s removable wall panels are made from bagasse, a derivative of sugarcane. Sugarcane is considered to be a renewable resource since it grows quickly and can be harvested up to 3 times a year. Since they’re plant based, WallArt claims that these decorative panels are completely compostable.

The panels are available in a variety of different designs, from faux brick to ellipses, cubes, pebbles and flows. WallArt offers a complete installation guide on their side, with picture-based instructions and materials lists. The idea of recyclable wall panels is pretty attractive, especially if you’re not yet an accomplished DIY-er, but they still require traditional caulk and primer, which can be full of toxic VOCs. Seeking out natural alternatives to these adhesives and paints would make this a truly eco-friendly renovation product.

 

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog