Deal With The ‘Devil,’ Invest In Iranian Renewable Energy

Editor’s Note: EarthTechling is proud to repost this article courtesy of OilPrice.com. Author credit goes to Jen Alic.

Why are we even talking about Iran’s nuclear program when renewable energy offers a clear way out of this conundrum? If we can remove bad politics from the equation for a moment and get back to business as usual, energy diplomacy with Iran could render the nuclear question irrelevant altogether.

The West is not alone in the pursuit of renewable energy capacity. Middle Eastern countries are on the same path, and that includes Iran. Iran’s nuclear energy efforts were initially a reflection of the reality that oil and gas resources will not last forever. The answer to this reality was to fall back on nuclear energy, which has in turn become the focal point of a bitter conflict between Iran and the West.

image via Shutterstock

But even nuclear energy is becoming yesterday’s news, both because of the push to harness renewable energy sources and also as a result of nuclear disasters, most recently that in Fukushima—which very clearly demonstrated the inability to protect nuclear facilities from Mother Nature.

Helping Iran to shift to the development of renewable energy resources would gradually remove all justification and necessity for a nuclear energy program, not the least because nuclear energy is the purview of states rather than private corporations, so there is money to be made.

That Iran is keen to pursue renewable energy efforts is clear enough. In May this year, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad approved the allocation of €500 million from the €35 billion National Development Fund for renewable energy projects. The money is earmarked for loans for smaller developers. This purpose of the National Development Fund is to ensure that oil and gas revenues are reinvested in social development projects, with renewable energy playing a growing role.

Also supporting the solar industry is the state-sponsored Renewable Energy Organization of Iran (SUNA), which is attached to the Energy Ministry and enjoys a budget of around $60 million.

In 2010, the Iranian government announced plans to build 2,000MW of renewable energy capacity over the next five years. As of that same year, Iran had 8,500MW of hydroelectric capacity and 130MW of wind energy capacity. Iranian officials also said at the time that private companies had signed contracts to build more than 600MW of biomass systems and 500MW of new wind energy projects.

Iran is also working to make renewable energy commercially viable and the Ministry of Energy is required to buy privately produced renewable energy at world market prices. A feed-in-tariff (FiT) for wind and biomass energy of around 13 cents/kWh also helps.

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