The Other Bloombox: An iPhone Dock + Flower Pot

It seems that for every one piece of electronic equipment that hits the market, there are about 100 accessories designed to help you personalize or improve it. When it comes to the iPhone, there are cases, bike mounts, and amplifiers galore, yet the public, and Kickstarter in general never seem to tire of them.

When it comes to the Bloombox (no, not the famous fuel cell or this self-contained hydroponic system), the genius can be found in its perfect combination of a simple yet versatile design. Not only does this clever device serve as both docking station and amplifier for your iPod or iPhone, it’s also a minimalist planter that can bring some much-needed greenery to your home or office.

bloom-box-iPhone-docking station

Image via Nicholas Hyde and Brennan Conroy/Kickstarter

We asked Bloombox designer Nicholas Hyde what made his iPod amp so special, and here’s what he had to say: “The Bloombox amplifies sound similar to those abundant wood blocks on Kickstarter in that it’s hollow, the main difference here is the bigger amount of empty space on our design, it wasn’t the original intention though, just happened that way. The difference is about a 30 percent increase in amplified sound. It also just kinda sounds nicer too. Au natural.”

A 30 percent boost in volume is nothing to sneeze at. But is anything really going to grow in that shallow, plaster planter? Hyde says yes, and not just cacti either. “There’s a wide variety of plants that will flourish in the provided space, mainly the succulent, which are currently trending at the moment,” Hyde explains. “Airplants work great too, you can also put soil in there and grow some smaller plants although they might max out around 6 months and need to be re-potted.”

If you think a Bloombox would go great with your feng shui, check out the project’s Kickstarter page. Just three days in an it’s already closing in on the halfway mark! A $50 donation makes it yours.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog