Pius Not A Prius, But A Build It Yourself Electric Vehicle

Editor’s Note: EarthTechling is proud to repost this article courtesy of Green Car Reports. Author credit goes to Nikki Gordon-Bloomfield.

There was a time when wanting an electric car meant you probably had to build it yourself, either creating a car from scratch or converting an existing gasoline car.

With great production electric cars on the market, fewer enthusiasts are building their own electric car, but now a company from Japan has unveiled a single seat electric car that owners will have to build themselves.

Modi Pius

image via Modi

Say hello to the Modi Corp. Pius, a tiny vehicle that looks like a cross between a neighborhood electric vehicle and (dare we say it?) a pedal car.

Don’t let its childish looks fool you however. While the 98-inch long and 48-inch wide electric car is technically classed as a class-1 motorized bicycle in its home country, the tiny electric vehicle will be put into colleges, not kindergartens.

According to crazyengineers.com, Modi Corp. hopes to sell the tiny vehicle to mechanical schools, colleges and universities across Japan, where it will be used to teach engineering students the basics of how electric cars work.

Teaching the next-generation about electric cars is always a good thing, but we can’t help feel that the tiny Pius is a little underperforming to get students excited.

After all, we’ve covered some much more impressive college and university builds on GreenCarReports, including one that went a whole lot faster than 20 mph.

Is the Pius a good idea to get students excited by electric cars, or an embarrassment to the electric car world?

Let us know in the comments below.

  • Cmoom4920

    I would have bought a neighborhood electric car several years ago, but 23 miles per hour would have gotten me killed.

  • Snotto

    Faster speeds are really easy but not always safe. Probably these are slow for liability reasons…

    There’s the Wind Explorer, that nice German wind-charged electric car
    that goes 80 km/hr, or about 50 mph, 300 to 430 kilometers per day. They
    toured 3000 miles across Australia with it and their bamboo wind
    turbine. http://www.wired.com/autopia/2011/02/wind-powered-car-makes-3000-mile-journey/

  • I guess it might be fun to build your very own electric car from the different parts. I would like to have a go at building one, but I dare not drive it on roads. It does not look to be safe for the roads. I think it is a great idea if used to teach students about electric cars though.