Urban Getaway Brings New Meaning To ‘Living Roof’

When you live in a big city, going up onto the roof of your apartment or office building can be a much-needed respite from the hustle and bustle of the streets. The only problem is, there isn’t much up there on the roof. You can drag up a lawn chair or kiddie pool, but lounging on a black roof under the searing sun isn’t exactly going to recreate a lakeside cabin.

If you want a way to enjoy the urban skyline, while still answering some emails or spending time with a good book, a futuristic capsule room by adNAU is the perfect solution. Too bad it’s still just a concept.

NAU Living Roof

image via adNAU/Behance

Named the “Living Roof” (a clever play on ‘living room’), the capsule is intended to serve as an urban rooftop getaway, but could just as easily be placed in a backyard garden or on a beach, as well.  The pod’s ultra-insulated shell and regenerative systems (mini wind turbines, a rainwater catchment system, and integrated photovoltaic cells) allow the Living Roof to exist largely off the grid (it’s not clear how they would solve the plumbing issue).

Living Roof

image via adNAU/Behance

Inside, rather than dispersing activities horizontally, a functional ring vertically combines sleep, lounge and work areas.  Guests can choose their desired mode and rotate the appropriate module downwards for use.

Living Roof

image via adNAU/Behance

With predictions that almost three-quarters of the world’s population will live in large cities by 2050, it’s become increasingly necessary to expand and diversify housing options–particularly those that are vertical rather than horizontal. As compact yet high tech units, the Living Roof capsules could be a modern solution for sustainable urban living in years to come.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog