Food Scrap Shredder Cranks Up Composting

Composting is a great way to reduce your contribution to landfill waste, while upcycling what would otherwise be garbage into a valuable soil amendment. Even though the concept of composting is simple–let biodegradable things rot and get rewarded with nutrient dense soil–there are little subtleties, like chemical balances and mold infestations, that often intimidate novices.

One thing I’ve always been unsure of is how scrappy food scraps need to be in order to be received well by the compost pile. For instance, can I throw an entire pineapple rind, or do I need to cut it up into tiny chunks? One thing I don’t relish is the idea of chopping up a lot of food that I’m not even going to eat. Thankfully, someone else already observed this dilemma, and invented the Green Cycler.

Green Cycler

Image via Ecotonix

The Green Cycler was invented by Gail Loos, an avid organic gardener and home composter who was frustrated with the lack of products that could help fill the gap between her kitchen and compost heap. Like many composting fans, Loos knew that the smaller she could get her organic waste, the faster it would be assimilated into her compost pile. “Every solution I tried, including using a food processor for grinding, took too many steps, and had a significant ‘ick factor.’ I decided to come up with my own,” said Loos.

The hand-operated Green Cycler easily grinds through kitchen scraps–even sturdy fibrous material. According to Ecotonix, the Colorado-based product development group that brought it to market, this is the primary and significant feature that differentiates the Green Cycler from other crocks, containers and bins

The device also features a self-contained stainless-steel blade cartridge that allows the entire grinding mechanism to be removed for dishwashing, as well as an ergonomically designed storage and pouring container the discourages pests while reducing the volume of organic material through evaporation before it even gets to the compost heap. The device, which is expected to be available in June, can be pre-ordered for $139.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog

  • http://21stcenturygardener.com/ composting apartment

    This is going to be big. Excellent concept, I hope you sell a bunch.