Spring Greening: Do It, And You Might Win

It’s that time of year again, when we start thinking about doing a good old-fashioned spring cleaning. But a new conservation alliance wants folks to start thinking about incorporating a “Spring Greening” into their annual household cleaning ritual as well.

TogetherGreen, an  alliance between the National Audubon Society and Toyota, has launched the Spring Greening Challenge. The Facebook application provides weekly conservation challenges to users, and those who complete the challenges can win prizes. The campaign is part of the alliance’s larger strategy to help promote conservation.  To date, TogetherGreen says, it has contributed $5.8 million dollars worth of volunteer support to causes, improved 10,540 acres of wildlife habitat, and engaged 218,311 participants through its grants, fellowships and volunteer days programs.

recycling

image via Shutterstock

The application encourages users to save water, protect habitats and reduce energy. Users can download the Facebook app at: http://www.facebook.com/togethergreen. Weekly challenges include everything from buying recycled products to unplugging unused appliances. Once a challenge is completed and participants click the “I Did It” button, they are entered in weekly and grand prize drawings.

“These challenges are easy enough that anyone can participate—from the suburbanite in St. Louis to the San Francisco city dweller to the rural ranch owner in Montana—yet impactful enough to make a real difference,” Elizabeth Sorrell, digital media manager for TogetherGreen at National Audubon Society said in a statement. “TogetherGreen is all about people-powered conservation and we hope that Spring Greening proves that even small actions add up to large change.”

The Spring Greening Challenge app will be online and offering challenges through through April 23. Prizes for participation include weekly drawings for 25 winners to receive t-shirts. Three grand prizes of $250, $100 and $50 gift certificates to Lowe’s will also be handed out.

Kristy Hessman is a writer and native Oregonian who currently resides in California. Before starting her own company, she worked as a reporter covering business and politics for daily newspapers and The Associated Press.