Green Job Openings Surge, Sector Tracker Reports

It’s only really been within the last few years that federal and state governments, along with private analysts, have really begun tracking job figures specific to the green sector. Earlier we brought you some of the first numbers put out by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics showing green jobs in the United States totaled 3.1 million in 2010.

Now the Green Job Bank is reporting a dramatic increase in the number of U.S.-based green job openings. The site, which gets its data from its green job search engine, came up with 36,500 green jobs posted during the latest quarter, double the number it indexed for the first quarter of 2011.

green job bank

image via Shutterstock

The Green Job Bank says it compiles its numbers from a variety of sources on the Web, including the websites of green employers, recruiters, nonprofit organizations, associations and job boards. It finds that the green companies now hiring cover a wide range of renewable energy and automotive industries. Some of the most recognizable companies posting openings: Tesla Motors, SolarCity and Opower.

California, which has experienced a surge in solar power jobs, had the most openings. The Golden State had 1,900 active jobs posted in the first quarter of this year. Texas was second with 745 jobs, followed by New York with 648. Massachusetts, Florida, Pennsylvania, Colorado, Virginia, DC and Illinois completed the list of the top 10.

“This increase in green job postings is due to the growth of the green economy. It is the proof that the market for renewable energy, clean technology and environmental projects is healthy, and growing at a steady pace,” Bernard Ferret, founder and CEO of the Green Job Bank, said in a statement.

Kristy Hessman is a writer and native Oregonian who currently resides in California. Before starting her own company, she worked as a reporter covering business and politics for daily newspapers and The Associated Press.

    • sceptical at best

      I’m sure many companies are classifying themselves as green even if they are not necessarily entirely so.  Even oil companies are trying to promote themselves as green.

    • Safety

      Where’s their harnesses?