Building A Green Tampa: One Man’s Online Pursuit

You can find just about anything on Kickstarter, the red-hot medium for financing creative projects, but we’re loving how it’s becoming a tool for geeky greens to pursue their goals (sometimes with success, sometimes not). The latest example: the proposal for a documentary about the green living potential in Florida’s Tampa Bay Area.

This comes from future documentary film maker Eric Stewart, whose doc will build on an existing website, Code Green Community, which connects people in the area who take a real interest in the potential of green communities to positively impact an area’s economy, delivering a more sustainable, adaptable and richly faceted city.

Code Green Community

image via Eric Stewart/Kickstarter

Much of the heavy lifting has already been done, and Stewart—who has up to now generated a website called Code Green Community and developed an analogous series of You Tube videos—hopes to build on his sturdy green framework via not only the above-mentioned documentary but by expanding the Green Living Economy map (which identifies Tampa-area businesses vested in sustainability) and a live feed.

So far, Stewart has attended numerous green area events, from an ECHO meeting in Ft. Myer with Permaculture Guild, to an unveiling of a retrofitted green commercial building. ECHO, or Education through Cultural and Historical Organizations, is an initiative that parallels the No Child Left Behind legislation of 2001. Permaculture, and the Guild, addresses the need for humans to work with nature, rather than against it, to build a sustainable world and preserve ecosystems.

Perhaps the most intriguing proposal is for a live feed in which Code Green Community members (and others) can broadcast 24/7 what they are doing to improve the community’s footprint and sustainability quotient. In addition, Stewart also plans to purchase new video gear, publish a weekly newsletter, set up a Ning account, market the website, help farmer’s market booths expand and hire one part-time employee to help carry what has clearly become a heavy, albeit very green, load.