Sound In A Sack From House Of Marley

House of Marley, a company whose products we enjoyed at CES 2012, recently released the newest addition to its family of portable audio gear: a “sound system in a sack” made from sustainable materials

The Marley Bag of Rhythm is made from Forest Stewardship Council-certified, sustainably sourced birch wood. It features a docking and charging station for both the iPod and iPad, twin 1-inch tweeters, twin 4.5-inch high-definition woofers all tucked into a cotton bag.

Marley Bag of Rhythm

Image via House of Marley

An aux-in port and cable means hundreds of devices, like high quality headphones, could also be connected. The Bag of Rhythm can be completely wireless when powered by standard D batteries, or enjoyed indefinitely by using a universal 100/240 BAC power adapter or 12V car plug.

Carrying around a fabric boom box might seem a little old school when nearly every phone and laptop out there these days is perfectly capably of external playback. But it makes good sense logistically: laptops are bulky, phone sound quality is often lacking and there’s always the issue of running down your battery. The Bag of Rhythim presents an easy (and dare we say hip?) way to take your favorite music from your basement to the beach with minimum hassle.

Marley Bag of Rhythm

Image via House of Marley

Audiophiles will be pleased to know that the Bag of Rhythm is built to produce the Marley “Signature” Sound, which claims to combine powerful bass with stunning mids and an energetic high-end. To achieve this vibrant sound, House of Marley puts each product through a custom tuning for its particular size, shape and material.

But what’s really cool about the Bag of Rhythm is how it furthers Bob Marley’s values of peace and unity. House of Marley donates 5 percent of its annual profits to 1Love.org, an organization that works to lift up a new generation of “young gongs” to strike the hammer for charities, causes and ideas that can change the world.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog

Be first to comment