New HDTV An Energy Miser With Quick Response

It seems almost comical to think that just 20 years ago, we were watching square televisions that required a forklift to move from one room to the other. Now, high-definition televisions are getting wider, flatter and cheaper by the second, making it possible to recreate the movie theater right in our own living rooms.

But there’s just one problem with these ultra-bright, ultra-powerful TVs: they suck up a ton of energy. So in addition to making their products easier to carry, many flat screen TV makers are also trying to shrink their energy footprint. The newest LED monitor from AOC delivers high definition images and a two millisecond response time, in addition to reducing power consumption while in use.

AOC HD LED TV

image via AOC

According to a company statement, the 27-inch e2752Vh can display 16.7 million colors while offering a 2ms response time that provides crisp images even during fast action sequences in games or movies. In addition, the e2752Vh is Energy Star-compliant, features an LED backlight that’s completely free of toxic mercury, and an “eSaver” feature that lets users preset energy conservation modes for the display when it’s not in use. AOC claims that the monitor’s power saving mode uses 50 percent less power than the standard operating mode, and standby mode uses only 0.1 watts.

Those who use flat screen monitors for their computing needs will be happy to know that the e2753Vh includes easily accessible digital and power connections that are rear-facing for direct insertion, an embedded Screen+ software that divides the screen into four self-contained work areas for improved productivity, and an alarm clock that can be set to turn off the monitor automatically.

The e2752Vh will hit national retailers in April with a price tag around $299.99.

Beth Buczynski is a freelancer writer and editor currently living in the Rocky Mountain West. Her articles appear on Care2, Ecosalon and Inhabitat, just to name a few. So far, Beth has lived in or near three major U.S. mountain ranges, and is passionate about protecting the important ecosystems they represent. Follow Beth on Twitter as @ecosphericblog