Designer’s Smart Scoot Concept Makes Sense

When California-based designer Karina Karol designed her new electric scooter concept, Sense, she didn’t just sketch two wheels, handlebars and a seat and call it good. Nope. Karol went way beyond just designing a mere scooter, she designed a lifestyle. Karol’s vision for the Sense doesn’t just have to do with things like range, speed and battery life; her Sense scooter also incorporates notions of community, branding, fashion and a range of highly styled accessories to go along with her electric vehicle.

Karol has released almost no technical specs on her concept other than to say it’s powered by electricity. The scoot also incorporates a solar panel on its front windscreen/steering column that is used to charge the dashboard display and the LED lighting system. Other than that, the new scooter concept looks very conventional, sporting a twist-and-go throttle, handlebar-mounted brakes, a compact unibody frame and, if you don’t mind snuggling, room for two.

sense1

image via Karina Karol

Behind the controls, the new Sense offers a standard speedometer display, but that’s about where the similarities end. The new Sense concept features a fully integrated dashboard that displays — well, just about anything you want. The scooter is designed to link tools such as phone, email and social networking. Karol has also has included a navigation system designed just for the Sense. The system uses personal information to provide suggestions based on your needs, travel history, preferences. And, of course, the Sense can also help you find parking, a charging station, your destination — even your friends.

sense electric scooter

image via Karina Karol

If you are riding the Sense, you don’t want to be seen on the street yelling commands at your scooter. To that end, the Sense comes with its own proprietary helmet that offers voice assistance, navigation help and other services. But the Sense doesn’t stop at just a scoot and a fancy helmet. Karol also envisions all sorts of scooting accessories such as sleek looking jackets and scooting wear all to be sold at fashionable Sense boutiques.

There is, however, one small glitch in the Sense plans. Korean scooter manufacturer Kasea already offers a scooter called the Sense, but besides those two wheels, a handlebar and a seat, the 49cc, 6.5 horsepower gasoline-powered Korean scoot bear very little resemblance to its electric concept cousin.

Steve Duda lives in West Seattle, WA with three dogs and a lot of outdoor gear. A part-time fly fishing fishing guide and full-time writer, Steve’s work has appeared in Rolling Stone, Seattle Weekly, American Angler, Fly Fish Journal, The Drake, Democracy Now! and many others.

    • No matter how much you fancy it up for the stylish set, the electric scooter is still a slug.u00a0 They’re heavy, slow, and dangerous.u00a0 The only way to scoot is with a light, 10hp 2-stroke engine, strong enough to power you out of harm’s way.u00a0 Electric scooters are a death trap.