Puerto Rico’s First Wind Farm Financed

Pattern Energy Group has secured financing for Finca de Viento Santa Isabel, the first commercial wind energy project in Puerto Rico. The 75-megawatt (MW) project in the southern municipality of Santa Isabel is expected to generate enough electricity to power approximately 25,000 homes. Energy produced at the plant will be purchased by the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority, under a 20-year power purchase agreement.

According to Puerto Rico Gov. Luis G. Fortuño, project is a reflection of the country’s comprehensive energy reform program. Construction on the wind farm, which will use Siemens‘ new SWT-2.3-108 turbines, is scheduled to begin in October. According to Pattern, approximately 150 jobs will be created during the construction process, and the plant will be completed by September 2012. Upon completion, 8-10 jobs will be required to operate the facility.

Siemens Turbine

image via Siemens

“With this project, Pattern enters into a partnership with Puerto Rico to pioneer its much-needed energy diversification and lead the way to cleaner and more efficient energy sources,” said Mike Garland, CEO of Pattern. “The provision of financing demonstrates the confidence that investors have placed in both Pattern’s proven ability to successfully see projects through to completion and in Puerto Rico as a viable market for the development of renewable energy in the long term.”

Pattern Energy Group LP is an energy company that develops, constructs, owns, and operates renewable energy and transmission assets in the United States, Canada and Latin America. The company has developed, financed and placed into operation more than 2,500 MW of wind power projects. Pattern currently operates 520 MW of wind energy in North America, and has a development pipeline exceeding 4,000 MW of renewable energy and transmission projects. The project is being financed by Siemens Financial Services.

Lauren Craig is a writer and consultant living in Seattle, WA. She holds an M.S. in International Development from Tulane University, and is co-founder of Sustainable Systems Integrators, LLC., an employee-owned solar energy design and installation firm in New Orleans, LA. She is also certified in PV design and installation by the North American Board of Certified Energy Practitioners (NABCEP).

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_MP4ZTWMKOBZJMLWDRYC6ZFA5OA victor

    Three cheers for Gov. Fortuno,u00a0 Energy prices are sky high in Puerto Rico,,nWind power is the way to go,u00a0 Let us all remember, ocean generators arenanother alternative to high electicityu00a0charges..u00a0 u00a0

  • http://www.wind-smith.com Wind Smith

    Very good.u00a0 Puerto Rico is well situated to benefit from wind power, being an island in the middle of the sea.u00a0 Why not harness the energy native to the island, rather than import energy from elsewhere?

  • Elliott Heimel

    The Project in Puerto Rico makes great Economic Sense. Positively, Yea Green… Thumbs-up.!! http://energyreviewsinfo.com

  • Gorozco38

    As an Employee of Wanzek Construction, and Mastec Tech. I will be heading down to Puerto Rico, to help build and this grate wind farm. So exited.

  • velezcan

    It’s about time Puerto Rico comes into the 21st century. There are so many natural resources that are untapped, solar and wind energy being the biggest, and because of political strife and ignorance these resources have not been exploited. Puerto Rico has the uniqueness of being in the center of caribbean exposing it to 365 days of sunshine and wind currents. If we can harness these energy resources it could provide the solution we need to overcome our high cost of fossil fuel consumption.

  • Bradley

    Drove by today.  Lots of wind mills, none turning despite the brisk wind.  

  • RJ

    Ahh Guys- the turbines don’t work in Santa Isabel, PR. What the heck is going on here in Puerto Rico? How much PR monies were ripped off on this scheme? You guys now have to fess up. Who’s responsible for this Blow Job???