Study: Indiana Needs More Green Jobs

According to a new survey published by the University of Indiana, there are not enough green jobs in the state. The survey found that almost two percent — 46,879 — of the state’s workforce are employed in ‘green jobs.”

“Given that green jobs in the Hoosier state currently comprise 1.7 percent of the total workforce,” said Timothy F. Slaper, director of economic analysis at the Indiana Business Research Center, part of Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business, “the number of green jobs will be insufficient to absorb the many displaced workers, at least in the near future. The industries with the greatest concentrations of green jobs in Indiana are manufacturing and construction, both under considerable stress at present and highly sensitive to economic cycles.”

greenjobs

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In the survey, a green job is defined as a, “primary occupation [that] leads to generating a firm’s green-related products or services. According to the survey, most green jobs in Indiana are involved in either increasing energy efficiency or in agriculture and natural resource conservation. Construction, services and trade accounted for well over 60 percent of green jobs. Manufacturing industries accounted for a mere 6,660 of the 46,879 jobs.

Of the 256 unique occupations that are both in high demand and earn above average wages, only 42 are green, said the report. In contrast, about 3.1 percent of neighboring Michigan‘s jobs are green. Michigan reported 25,780 green jobs in transportation equipment manufacturing in 2009, while Indiana posted a mere 1,700.

Steve Duda lives in West Seattle, WA with three dogs and a lot of outdoor gear. A part-time fly fishing fishing guide and full-time writer, Steve’s work has appeared in Rolling Stone, Seattle Weekly, American Angler, Fly Fish Journal, The Drake, Democracy Now! and many others.