St. Louis Boasts Its First Net Zero Home

The city of St. Louis  has its first net-zero residence. When Jim and Phyllis Young put solar panels on their home, Microgid Energy informed them that they were actually generating energy that gets put back on the electrical grid, making theirs the first net-zero home in the city.

The accomplishment, reported in a Clayton-Richmond Heights Patch article, is just one of a number of solar projects the city of Saint Louis hopes to see in the coming years. Some generous incentives that can reduce the upfront costs of solar by as much as 75 percent, according to officials at Microgrid Energy – the company that installed the Young’s solar installation – accompanied this project.

Via Microgrid Energy

The Young’s solar project includes a 3.36 kilowat (KW) solar array. The high tech solar panels are combined on the roof of the couple’s historic Victorian home. Each month, the Young’s electric bill will be credited for the amount of solar power their house puts back on the grid. Microgrid noted that this installation “puts energy on the grid via an interconnection agreement which allows your meter to spin forwards and backwards…[this project] evenly went forward and backwards over the course of 12 months, thus making it net-zero.”

Microgrid Energy is based in the Midwest and provides building energy performance services, renewable energy and energy efficiency consulting and installation services for commercial and residential clients.

Kristy Hessman is a writer and native Oregonian who currently resides in California. Before starting her own company, she worked as a reporter covering business and politics for daily newspapers and The Associated Press.

    • Hello, I am a Director at Microgrid Energy.u00a0 We just wanted to say thank you for featuring us on your site.u00a0 We are very proud of this project, and hope it’s the start of something big in the Midwest!nnTo clarify, every solar install Microgrid installs “puts” energy on the grid via an interconnection agreement which allows your meter to spin forwards and backwards.u00a0 In this article in evenly went forward and backwards over the course of 12 months, thus making it “net-zero”.nnThe city itself did not provide the incentives, the incentives are basic in nature (30% Federal Tax Credit and $2/Watt Utility Rebate) to add up to 75%.u00a0 This is not a St. Louis specific thing by any means, but we are very proud to do this project in such a historic part of St. Louis in this old of a home.

      • Thanks for the update. We enhanced the article with your information.

    • Dan

      I think that we will start seeing more and more net-zero homes in the near future. Right now, it’s pretty expensive to do projects like this, but alternative energy will be one of the biggest markets in the world in the near future. As technology advances and more competitors enter the race, prices will drop, making things more affordable for the average person.

    • Gerry

      1950 sf iin south countyu00a0+ 4.17 array = net sero for the first 6 months of operation