Green Tech Model City Planned For Testing

Practically every day we report on cleantech breakthroughs coming out of government labs, the private sector and universities. Before those new insights can be deployed, however, they need to be tested – which is where Pegasus Global Holdings hopes to enter the picture, and in a pretty wild way.

The firm is planning to build a 20-square-mile testing center modeled on a medium-sized American city – with urban, suburban and rural areas, standard roads, buildings, power, water, telecommunications and operating systems – where green energy, smart transport, wireless technology and homeland security technologies can be tested in a way that mirrors the real world.

The Center, Pegasus Global Holdings cleantech testing center

image via Shutterstock

“The idea for ‘The Center’ was born out of our own company’s challenges in trying to test new and emerging technologies beyond the confines of a sterile lab environment,” Robert H. Brumley, Pegasus Global’s CEO said in a statement, which we first caught wind of on Smart Planet. “The Center will allow private companies, not-for-profits, educational institutions and government agencies to test in a unique facility with real world infrastructure, allowing them to better understand the cost and potential limitations of new technologies prior to introduction.”

The Associated Press reported Pegasus was eying a couple of possible locations in New Mexico for the testing center: the Albuquerque-Santa Fe corridor, and down south in the Las Cruces area. While Pegasus said it intends to privately finance the project, New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez said she’s all for it, and the state has agreed to provide “nonfinancial resources” in helping site and build the project. Pegasus estimates 350 direct jobs from its construction, and 10 times that number of indirect jobs.

Sports columnist, newspaper desk guy, website managing editor, wine-industry PR specialist, freelance writer—Pete Danko’s career in media has covered a lot of terrain. The constant along the way has been a fierce dedication to knowing the story and getting it right. Danko's work has appeared in Wired, The New York Times, San Francisco Chronicle and elsewhere.