Energy Efficiency A Boon To Missouri Economy?

A study recently released by the American Council for and Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) says that by taking on energy-efficient measures, Missourians can save $6.1 billion in energy costs and create 8,500 new jobs by 2025. This set of cost-effective energy efficiency policies can meet 17% of the state’s electricity needs by 2025 and 10% of natural gas use compared to a business-as-usual scenario.

The study is part of a series of studies by ACEEE to assess the energy efficiency levels of states. Missouri’s report looks at the efforts being made as of now to help the state become more efficient, as well has a set of ten policies whose implementation could boost the state’s economy and energy-efficiency investments in a significant way. Some prospective policies include manufacturing and agricultural initiatives, regulations for utilities, and upgrades of public buildings.

Image via American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy

In 2009, Missouri enacted legislation that made efficiency investments equal in value to traditional energy investments, but the effects of this are still in the process of taking effect, so it is difficult to determine their success. Meanwhile, individual consumers and businesses alike are still facing challenges when attempting to invest in energy efficiency, due to limited access to money or a lack of technical knowledge.

“As Missouri’s lowest cost energy resource, efficiency should be the state’s first-priority resource in its energy future,” said study author Maggie Molina, “Energy efficiency is a commonsense, win-win-win solution that can save Missourians energy and money and stimulate job creation. Energy efficiency measures for homes and businesses…can lower energy use—which means lower energy bills and more money in consumers’ pockets.”

Laura Caseley is a graduate of SUNY New Paltz and a resident of New York State’s Hudson Valley. She writes for several publications and when she’s not writing, she can usually be found painting in her makeshift studio or enjoying the scenery of her hometown.