Solar Power Coming To 90+ California Schools

The California School Boards Association (CSBA) recently partnered with SunPower to launch the Solar Schools program, which will help school districts develop and install solar projects at schools. Within the coming year, more than 90 schools across the state – at the elementary, secondary and higher-education level – are scheduled to be fitted with solar installations.

The Solar Schools program is designed to help schools save on energy, a savvy move in the face of shrinking budgets and rising utility rates, and make the best investments possible. The schools can also take advantage of the California Solar Initiative, a program that offers financial incentives to public facilities to use solar power. The states says the school could save as much as $1.5 billion over 30 years with the installation of solar power systems.

Image via San Ramon Valley Unified School District

The San Ramon Unified School District, which is getting five installations, is expected to save $2 million in electricity costs during its first year of solar use, the CSBA said. The district has also implemented renewable energy education in its classrooms, with help from SunPower: The company is working with San Ramon’s engineering academy to prepare students for future careers in the clean technology field. Other schools participating in the Solar Schools program are planning similar curricula.

San Ramon Superintendent Steven W. Enoch called the solar initiative “extremely innovative in helping us to maximize our immediate cost savings. Slated for completion by this fall, our solar installations will supply substantial savings to our district’s general fund, while preserving precious financial resources.”

Laura Caseley is a graduate of SUNY New Paltz and a resident of New York State’s Hudson Valley. She writes for several publications and when she’s not writing, she can usually be found painting in her makeshift studio or enjoying the scenery of her hometown.

    • Mainsah Gilbert

      Is there a possiblity for schools in the developing countries to benefit from these initiatives as one of their main problem is the lack of electricity and poverty that may let them to have the high rated hydroelectric or thermal connections?

    • Mainsah Gilbert

      Is there a possiblity for schools in the developing countries to benefit from these initiatives as one of their main problem is the lack of electricity and poverty that may let them to have the high rated hydroelectric or thermal connections?

    • I was curious, where are these panels coming from? More Chinese trade imbalance? But no…..nnSunPower Corp. (SPWRA), a U.S. solar-panel maker majority owned by French oil companyu00a0Total SA (FP), will build and operate a factory in Mexicali, Mexico, to meet demand from a growing North American solar market.nnVery interesting.