Green Neighborhood: A First In Howard County

As far as large homebuilders go, Ryan Homes has focused enough attention on green building to have been designated an Energy StarPartner. Now the developer is focusing its attention on The Greens at Locust Chapel, the first community to earn Howard County’s Green Neighborhood distinction.

The development in Ellicott City, Maryland, conforms to Howard County’s Department of Planning and Zoning guidelines for Green Neighborhood designation, which include open space provisions, water conservation management, minimal-impact construction materials, energy efficient appliances, fixtures and advanced ventilation techniques.

The Greens at Locust Chapel, Maryland

image via Ryan Homes

The program is divided into two components – “Sites” and “Homes” – both of which must be fulfilled for a community to be recognized as a Green Neighborhood. As far as green developments go, these guidelines place more emphasis on elements like natural grading and reuse of trees than on the use of sustainable building materials and systems, but all the homes at The Greens at Chapel Hill do feature rain barrels and have access to a solar-powered clubhouse with a green roof.

More information on the development is available online.

Susan DeFreitas has covered all manner of green technology for EarthTechling since 2009. She is a graduate of Prescott College for the Liberal Arts and the Environment, and has a background in marketing green businesses. Her work on green living has been featured in Yes! Magazine, the Utne Reader and Natural Home.

    • The Greens at Locust Chapel sounds like an interesting new green subdivision. It will be interesting to see if this new subdivision acts as a model to already-existing neighborhoods throughout Howard County. Potential incentives would be to set up a neighborhood competition for neighborhoods with most efficient homes as well as overall neighborhood efficiency and water management. It’s important to make our existing homes as efficient as possible rather than to simply build new homes. http://buildingwell.org