DOE Expands Private Sector Energy Partnership

The partnership between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Small Business and the Clean Energy Alliance (CEA) is expanding, it was recently announced. This means that now companies identified by the DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy can receive services from CEA member incubators, including tech support, financial and business planning, marketing and networking and legal advice.

Currently, there are 25 companies that have been matched with CEA members, with the help of the DOE, and many of them have been benefiting from their CEA support. By expanding the DOE/CEA Partnership, it is hoped that more companies can be reached and offered support.

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James F. Groelinger, CEA’s Executive Director, highlighted what he thought was a good example of the partnership. Versatilis, it was pointed out, is a DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) recipient that focuses on the development of flexible electronics and solar cells and recently had what is regarded as a positive moment for its business.

“Receiving support from CEA member E2TAC,” Groelinger said, “Versatilis won a top prize in an independently judged business plan competition at the Sixth Annual New Energy Symposium in New York. Similar accomplishments are likely to be achieved by many of the mentored companies in the DOE/CEA Partnership program.”

 

The DOE/CEA Partnership will come to a close in 2012, but all participating companies will be able to take advantage of a new program that supports their participation in the upcoming National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Industry Growth Forum.

Charles Russomanno, Program Manager of DOE’s Phase III Xlerator Program, was pleased to see the expansion of the program, because, he said, “small businesses are the core of technology development and job creation, but the challenges faced on the path to commercialization are staggering.”

Laura Caseley is a graduate of SUNY New Paltz and a resident of New York State’s Hudson Valley. She writes for several publications and when she’s not writing, she can usually be found painting in her makeshift studio or enjoying the scenery of her hometown.