WindMade Wind Power Label Does What?

What’s in a label? Consider Energy Star. The organization that sets an international standard for energy efficient consumer products is widely known across the U.S. and attracts energy and eco-conscious consumers of all manner of appliances and electronics with its label. Now, a new label that aims to help increase the voluntary purchase of renewable wind energy and attract consumers to companies that are committed to clean energy is making its formal introduction.

The “WindMade” label, which we first learned about earlier this year, reflects a standard that “requires participating companies to source a minimum of 25 per cent of their electricity demand from wind power”.  Its sponsors report that the goal they picked intends to” strike a balance between an ambitious target and an achievable goal for progressive companies striving to make a tangible impact.” On June 15th (Global Wind Day) in New York City, WindMade was given its initial debut.

WindMade

image via WindMade

The proposed WindMade standard is said to have been developed by a committee of experts hailing from the World Wildlife Fund, American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), LEGO, Climate Friendly, Gold Standard, and Vestas Wind Systems. The first draft of the proposal was repotedly reviewed by a group made up of companies and organisations that includes Walmart, 3Degrees, Better Place, and Dong Energy.

The finalized version of the new standard  is expected to be released in September. After that announcement, interested companies can apply for WindMade certification. The group also said it plans to start working on a product specific standard later this year. In the mean time, interested parties can read through the current proposed certification process and make comments on it.

2 Comments

  • Reply June 20, 2011

    Anonymous

    Actually, the proposed standard allows simply buying “credits” equal to 25% of your electricity use, i.e., still sourcing 100% of your actual electricity the same as your neighbors.

  • Reply June 20, 2011

    Anonymous

    Actually, the proposed standard allows simply buying “credits” equal to 25% of your electricity use, i.e., still sourcing 100% of your actual electricity the same as your neighbors.

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