New Delhi Skyscraper Scrubs the Sky

Every year, eVolo Magazine’s Skyscraper Competition recognizes outstanding ideas that redefine skyscraper design through new technologies, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations. This year, first place went to a building few would define as a skyscraper, aside from its height: the LO2P Recycling Skyscraper.

Designed for New Delhi, one of the most polluted cities in the world, by Atelier CMJN (Julien Combes, Gaël Brulé) of France, the LO2P was conceived as a giant wind turbine made of recycled cars.

LO2P Recycling Skyscraper

image via eVolo Magazine

This is not a scheme in any way tangential to the surrounding environment, as it’s estimated that a thousand new cars hit the roads every day in this rapidly developing city. The building would put old, defunct cars to work in its infrastructure, while acting as a kind of giant lung that would clean New Delhi’s air through a series of large-scale greenhouses serving as filters.

Another set of rotating filters here capture suspended particles in the air while the waste heat and carbon dioxide from the recycling center are used to grow plants that in turn produce biofuels.

LO2P Recycling Skyscraper

image via eVolo Magazine

This doesn’t appear to be a building intended for human habitation, but rather, a building designed to make living in the surrounding environment a little easier, via green energy and a pollution filtration system composed of a series of particle collector membranes, elevated greenhouses, and mineralization baths.

Susan DeFreitas has covered all manner of green technology for EarthTechling since 2009. She is a graduate of Prescott College for the Liberal Arts and the Environment, and has a background in marketing green businesses. Her work on green living has been featured in Yes! Magazine, the Utne Reader and Natural Home.