Electric Postal Delivery Bicycle Unveiled

Simon Williams, an inventor from Australia, has revealed his prototype electric bike that was designed specifically for postal carriers. Calling the new vehicle the Deliver-E Trike, Williams was originally interested in developing an electric motorcycle before he saw a titling electric trike in 2005 called The RIDER. And while he didn’t see that particular invention as being useful for implementation as a road bike, he did see potential for delivery drivers.

Williams left his job to work as a postal carrier for 18 months to get an idea of what postal workers have to deal with on a daily basis. The three-wheel electric vehicle has two, rear arm-wheels that pivot independently, allowing it to rest against a slope on its own, something Williams believes is essential for a carrier vehicle. Another feature Williams says is necessary is a reserve gear, saving time and muscle backing-up a motorcycle manually.

Image via Gizmag

Williams road a Honda CT110 during his time as an Australian postman, and found it to be bulky, heavy, and difficult to maneuver. His tricycle sports two rear wheels that feature an electric motor in each, and 16 lithium-ion batteries than can be fully charged in three hours. The roughly 265 lbs vehicle can travel up to 37 miles, and has a top speed of 50 miles per hour.

Currently, Williams is seeking funding to mass produce the Delivery-E Trike, which he says can be manufactured in five hours. While the design is certainly intelligent, and an excellent example of how specialization can target ideal solutions, the electric vehicle could be limited by range and ability to deliver overly large Amazon.com orders.

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Aaron Colter is a freelance writer and marketing consultant in Portland, Oregon. A graduate of Purdue University, he has worked for the NCAA, Dark Horse Comics, Willamette Week, AOL, The Huffington Post, Top Shelf Productions, DigitalTrends, theMIX agency, SuicideGirls, EarthTechling, d'Errico Studios and others. He is also the co-founder of BananaStandMedia.com, a free record label, recording studio, and distribution service for independent musicians.

3 Comments

  • Reply March 22, 2011

    eldonjon72

    It needs a trailer. It will never be adopted without a trailer to increase capacity.

    • Reply March 22, 2011

      Isaac Cox

      Easy enough

  • Reply March 22, 2011

    Lala

    Maybe for a rural route (with some sort of trailer setup of course). This would never work for city routes though. Unless they were “all walking” routes and cut to allow for working the mail.

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