1700s English Mill Renovated Carbon Negative

The Old Corn Mill (which comes to us via World Interior Design Network) in Sheffield, England, has more than one claim to fame. This three-storey mill was built way back in the 1750s and, thanks to a recent renovation, is still in use today. It’s also one of just a few ‘carbon negative’ structures in the United Kingdom.

This intelligent renovation added two storeys to the old Yorkshire stone building in the form of an aluminium and glazed extension. Other noteworthy additions include two wind turbines in the building’s adjoining pastures, roof-mounted solar photovoltaic panels and a hydro water turbine planned for installation this summer on the weir on the River Don, which flows past the development.

Old Corn Mill

image via Chris Rowlands & Co.

A geothermal ground-source heat pump system provides warm air in the winter via a radiant, in-floor heating system supplemented by a heat recovery mechanism for maximum efficiency.

Interested in renting a suite in this “energy-efficient rural eco-office?” Units are currently available for £12.50 ($ 20.33) per sq ft per individual suite–though the developer would like you to keep in mind that operating costs at the Old Corn Mill are expected to come in around 75% lower than a conventional building for heating and around 35% less for power.  A complete fact sheet is available online [PDF].

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Susan DeFreitas has covered all manner of green technology for EarthTechling since 2009. She is a graduate of Prescott College for the Liberal Arts and the Environment, and has a background in marketing green businesses. Her work on green living has been featured in Yes! Magazine, the Utne Reader and Natural Home.